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brickellkid


Peace in Hebrew, English, and Arabic


america-wakiewakie:

(Communism via Facebook)


zodiacchic:

ZodiacChic Post:Leo



"A flower does not think of competing to the flower next to it. It just blooms."

from Zen Shin Talks (via serymn)



Given his background, what American Jewish leader Henry Siegman has to say about Israel’s founding in 1948 through the current assault on Gaza may surprise you. From 1978 to 1994, Siegman served as executive director of the American Jewish Congress, long described as one of the nation’s “big three” Jewish organizations along with the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League. Born in Germany three years before the Nazis came to power in 1933, Siegman’s family eventually moved to the United States. His father was a leader of the European Zionist movement that pushed for the creation of a Jewish state. In New York, Siegman studied the religion and was ordained as an Orthodox rabbi by Yeshiva Torah Vodaas, later becoming head of the Synagogue Council of America. After his time at the American Jewish Congress, Siegman became a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He now serves as president of the U.S./Middle East Project. In the first of our two-part interview, Siegman discusses the assault on Gaza, the myths surrounding Israel’s founding in 1948, and his own background as a German-Jewish refugee who fled Nazi occupation to later become a leading American Jewish voice and now vocal critic of Israel’s policies in the Occupied Territories.

"When one thinks that this is what is necessary for Israel to survive, that the Zionist dream is based on the repeated slaughter of innocents on a scale that we’re watching these days on television, that is really a profound, profound crisis — and should be a profound crisis in the thinking of all of us who were committed to the establishment of the state and to its success," Siegman says. Responding to Israel’s U.S.-backed claim that its assault on Gaza is necessary because no country would tolerate the rocket fire from militants in Gaza, Siegman says: "What undermines this principle is that no country and no people would live the way that Gazans have been made to live. … The question of the morality of Israel’s action depends, in the first instance, on the question, couldn’t Israel be doing something [to prevent] this disaster that is playing out now, in terms of the destruction of human life? Couldn’t they have done something that did not require that cost? And the answer is, sure, they could have ended the occupation."


lookbookdotnu:

Go behind the scenes of Agenda Long Beach! From rad art installations to screen-printing shops, skate parks and more - you’ll instantly see why it’s not your average trade show: http://lb.nu/1puPYTU

Pictured here: Alysha Nett

 




londonlongboards:

The magnificent Verdu: http://allaroundskate.com/featured-rider-cristina-verdu/


patternicity:

This is one of the saddest things I have ever seen.


Jon Stewart Explains The Most Outrageous Corporate Tax Dodge Yet

It’s the corporate tax loophole that could be costing you billions. American companies are quietly changing their paperwork to make it seem as if they’re no longer U.S. companies but instead owned by one of their overseas subsidiaries.

It’s called a corporate inversion. Or, as Jon Stewart described it on Wednesday night’s “Daily Show,” it’s “the business equivalent of gender reassignment.”

"It’s a liberating procedure for companies that have been raised American, but know in their heart they’re really Irish," he said.

So how does it work? Stewart offers the perfect example in the clip above.


Uncontacted Tribe Emerges From Brazil Rainforest After ‘Violent Attacks’

A previously uncontacted tribe has emerged from the jungles of Brazil suffering from flu and saying they’ve been shot at, according to reports.

Footage of the encounter at the Envira River, near the border with Peru, wasposted to YouTube by LiveLeak, and can be seen above. Since the Panoan language of the tribe is similar to that of other tribes, interpreters sent in by the government were able to speak with them.

They described being attacked by non-native people and many died after coming down with the flu and diphtheria,” said interpreter Jaminawa Jose Correia, according to a report on the G1 web portal and cited by AFP.

Several of the tribal people have been treated for flu, which could be especially deadly as they have no immunity to the disease.

“At first they were afraid and wary, but thankfully in the end they understood, believed us, trusted the medical team and accepted the medicine,” Carlos Travassos of Brazil’s National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) told Forbes. “It was a difficult and slow dialogue.”

Travassos added that “the group told us their tribe had been shot at by white men.”

While it’s not yet clear who has been shooting at them, advocates believe it was loggers and drug traffickers in Peru who have been moving into tribal lands, causing indigenous peoples to flee.

"If you’re a non-contracted tribe who has some knowledge but very little knowledge of that world out there and what you see is people coming in, stealing your resources, scaring off the game that you rely on for food and most dangerously wielding firearms — this must be an incredibly frightening experience,” Fiona Watson of Survival International told NPR.

Survival International advocates on behalf of uncontacted tribes and works with FUNAI.

This news could hardly be more worrying -– not only have these people confirmed they suffered violent attacks from outsiders in Peru, but they have apparently already caught flu,” Survival International director Stephen Corry said in a news release. “The nightmare scenario is that they return to their former villages carrying flu with them.”


Billionaire Republican Donor Pushes Argentina Into Default

America is arguably the most advanced economy in the world, but today it resembles a toddler who just accidentally pulled down the Christmas tree and set the house on fire.

That’s hyperbole, sure. But the fact is that one conservative American billionaire and a handful of American judges have just pushed Argentina, a nation of 43 million people with an economy bigger than that of the Netherlands or South Africa, into defaulting on its debt. It’s a move that threatens not only chaos for the Argentinian people, but potential chaos for other countries hoping to borrow money in the future.

"This is America throwing a bomb into the global economic system," Columbia University economist Joseph Stiglitz told The New York Times on Thursday in a front-page story about the battle.

paul singer
Billionaire Paul Singer
The conservative billionaire is Paul Singer of the hedge fund Elliott Management. Singer has given millions of dollars to George W. Bush, Mitt Romney and Swift Boat Veterans For Truth, to name a few causes (including, to his credit, support for gay marriage and LGBT rights). He has waged a years-long war with Argentina over its debt, driven by his fervent, conservative belief that debtors should pay creditors all of the money they owe, according to the NYT.

Elliott Management did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Here’s a quick sketch of the background on this complicated story: After Argentina defaulted on its debt in 2001 amid an economic depression, it forced most of its creditors to take a lot less money than they had loaned to Argentina in the first place. In bond-market lingo this is known as a “haircut,” and it is sort of like The Moe on the Spectrum of Desirable Haircuts.

But the Moe is arguably better than getting scalped (to continue the metaphor) — unless you are Paul Singer. He and a handful of other investors would rather get nothing, and pay millions of dollars to lawyers along the way, than settle for The Moe.

Through a Cayman Islands subsidiary, NML Capital, Singer had bought up a bunch of Argentinian debt on the cheap after the country defaulted. Then he and other holdout investors, including other “vulture funds” like his, began demanding Argentina pay them in full.

moe howard

The original Moe haircut (left)

Argentina refused to pay these vulture funds, on account of their being vultures, but kept on paying its Moe-coiffed bondholders. Singer said this sort of behavior made the ghost of Ayn Rand cry — I’m paraphrasing — and he fought and fought and fought it in court.

Then in 2012, a federal judge, Thomas Griesa of the Southern District of New York, got the gospel of Paul Singer. He decreed that Argentina could not keep paying its Moe-coiffed bondholders if it wasn’t paying Singer and the other holdouts. Not only that, but he also declared that any banks playing middle-man between Argentina and aforementioned Moe-coiffed bondholders would be in trouble with the law.

This was a radical decision. Worse, it might have been kind of stupid. Times columnist Floyd Norris pointed out recently that Griesa “had not completely understood the bond transactions that he had been ruling on for years.”

But the Second District Court decided that Griesa’s ruling was A-OK, leading Felix Salmon to call them “poltroons.” Poltroons, I say!

And then finally in June, the U.S. Supreme Court, led by Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, declined to hear Argentina’s appeal. Last-ditch negotiations to end the dispute failed Wednesday night, and Argentina did not make a scheduled bond payment — again, because Griesa had ordered it not to do so. Bada bing, bada boom, Argentina is in default and nobody gets paid.

Some of the blame for this is arguably Argentina’s. Maybe it should have weighed its disgust with Singer against the need to protect its citizens from another financial crisis. Forbes’ Agustino Fontevecchia suggests that maybe it didn’t protect itself well enough legally.

Fontevecchia also notes that Argentina still has time to cut a deal and forestall all of this. The nation has not reached the point of no return, beyond which it can’t borrow any more and its economy devolves into turmoil. But they’re closer to that point than they should be.

Singer’s victory stands to make it a lot harder for other debt-burdened countries to cut deals in the future, the International Monetary Fund warned last week. After all, what creditor is going to want to take The Moe when there’s hope some court will let them get … The Fabio?








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